Read Cold Earth Wanderers by Peter Wortsman Online

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Cold Earth Wanderers is a dystopian novel set in a completely built up world where vertical values are prized while all horizontal tendencies are suspect.16 year old Elgin Marble has had enough of a world that is decidedly vertical. When his father, an upstanding elevator man, is marked for disposal, Elgin joins an underground group called the Crabs. This illicit group tirCold Earth Wanderers is a dystopian novel set in a completely built up world where vertical values are prized while all horizontal tendencies are suspect.16 year old Elgin Marble has had enough of a world that is decidedly vertical. When his father, an upstanding elevator man, is marked for disposal, Elgin joins an underground group called the Crabs. This illicit group tirelessly digs tunnels in the hope of one day breaking through to the outside. But who are the Crabs, and can they be trusted? Elgin's mother, Ellen, is worried sick about her son. The ruthless school principal, Mr. Orion, warns her that Elgin is in big trouble and blackmails her for sexual favors. Together they go underground to search for the boy. Meanwhile, agents of the IVT (Institute for Vertical Thinking) are also hot on his trail, and the Crabs are feeling the heat....

Title : Cold Earth Wanderers
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781938349171
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 220 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Cold Earth Wanderers Reviews

  • Jason Trask
    2018-11-26 02:45

    COLD EARTH WANDERERSBy Peter Wortsman220 pp. Pelekinesis, $15.06 (paperback); $9.99 (ebook)Because Peter Wortsman’s newly published dystopian novel, Cold Earth Wanderers, is so rich in metaphor, it reads at times like a darkly comic fairy tale. For the average citizen of Wortsman’s not so distant future, life consists of the vertical axis only: experience of the two horizontal axes has been eliminated. One spends one’s entire life within a particular building, the rooms of which are tiny, nor are there windows through which to gain perspective. The goal of those in power is to rid people entirely of horizontal imagination and inculcate them with a sense of verticality.The ideal citizen is one who does not long for, does not think about, and most especially, does not speak about horizontal space. One’s desires, thoughts, and words should reflect vertical inclinations. There are people, however, who are not satisfied with this sort of life, and that’s where the problems begin.Enter Elgin, the 16-year old protagonist, whose father was recently eliminated—not for having broken any rules, mind you, but rather, his name came up randomly as one of the people who had to go. Elgin has always had certain horizontal inclinations. As a child, for instance, he created a toy train, rather than a toy elevator. Losing his father in this way, has enhanced his teenage rebel side and nothing could be more rebellious than horizontal thinking.What I find interesting is that while Wortsman has created a one-dimensional world, i.e., it exists on the vertical axis only, his characters are very much in the round—even the minor characters who belong to the underground group known as The Crabs. Elgin runs away and joins them. When he enters the vast, cavernous remains of Grand Central Station, Elgin is filled with a sense of awe as he experiences for the first time the other two dimensions. Wortsman captures this moment beautifully, not by describing the space itself, but by describing Elgin’s riveted gaze at the station’s giant clock.I enjoy Wortsman’s humor most when it is understated. What could be more understated than a dystopian novel from which the only hope of escape lies in heading through the Lincoln Tunnel to New Jersey.