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Often the differences between the three Abrahamic religions -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam -- seem more obvious than their commonalities, leading to the question "Do we worship the same God?" Can the answer be "yes" without denying our differences? This volume brings Jewish, Christian, and Muslim philosophers and theologians together to answer this question, offeringOften the differences between the three Abrahamic religions -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam -- seem more obvious than their commonalities, leading to the question "Do we worship the same God?" Can the answer be "yes" without denying our differences? This volume brings Jewish, Christian, and Muslim philosophers and theologians together to answer this question, offering rare insight into how representatives of each religion view the other monotheistic faiths. Each of their contributions uniquely approaches the primary question from a philosophical perspective that is informed by the practice of worship and prayer. Concepts covered include "sameness" and "oneness," the nature of God, epistemology, and the Trinity. Do We Worship the Same God? models serious-minded, honest, and respectful interreligious dialogue and gives us new ways to address an ongoing question....

Title : Do We Worship the Same God?: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Dialogue
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ISBN : 9780802866899
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Do We Worship the Same God?: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Dialogue Reviews

  • Robert D. Cornwall
    2019-01-01 08:59

    Miroslav Volf has brought together a series of essays that emerged from two conferences. The opening essays are written by Christian theologians Amy Plantiga Pauw, Christoph Schwobel, and Denys Turner. To these essays, Volf adds essays by Jewish philosophers/theologians Peter Ochs annd Alon Goshen-Gottstein, as well as Muslim scholar Reza Shah-Kazemi.The essays offer a hopeful response to the question, but note the challengages. presented by very different beliefs. As Reza Shah-Kazemi notes we're more able to affirm the proposition when we stay at the metaphysical and stay away from defining to closely the details of what our beliefs mean.

  • Roy Howard
    2019-01-03 04:00

    This book deserves a wide reading. If you belong to a congregation and community that chooses a book to read together, this should be at the top your list. Miroslav Volf and his colleagues at the Yale Center for Faith and Culture have assembled a group of stellar scholars to address the question that is asked in private circles of Christians, Jews and Muslims but rarely ever discussed aloud, much less answered in public. Volf’s contribution, Allah: A Christian Response, was published in 2011; these essays advance the discussion with considerable depth. The contributors include Peter Ochs (Jewish), Amy Plantinga Pauw (Christian), Denys Turner (Christian), Alon Goshen-Gottstein (Jewish), Reza Shah-Kazemi (Muslim) and Christoph Schwobel, (Christian). What makes their essays worth reading is not only the intellectual precision each brings to the question but the courage and honesty to speak with clarity about a subject that is usually avoided or reduced to sentimental claims of “oneness.” There is no sentimentality here. These essays provide a guideline for interfaith dialogue that risks deeper and more honest conversation disturbs on the way to a space on which to stand for the common good. There are practical reasons why this book is critically important, too. Presently minority Coptic Christians in Egypt are under serious threat by the majority Muslim population. The same is true in other areas of the Middle East, even as Christians leave those lands to majority Jewish or Muslim populations. These facts-on-the-ground affect the opinions of Christians, Jews and Muslims in this country resulting in ignorant accusations and preventing any serious conversation. This book can help further a different conversation that is critical for our future.