Read The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking by Eli Broad Online

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Unorthodox success principles from a billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropistEli Broad's embrace of "unreasonable thinking" has helped him build two Fortune 500 companies, amass personal billions, and use his wealth to create a new approach to philanthropy. He has helped to fund scientific research institutes, K-12 education reform, and some of the world's greatest contUnorthodox success principles from a billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropistEli Broad's embrace of "unreasonable thinking" has helped him build two Fortune 500 companies, amass personal billions, and use his wealth to create a new approach to philanthropy. He has helped to fund scientific research institutes, K-12 education reform, and some of the world's greatest contemporary art museums. By contrast, "reasonable" people come up with all the reasons something new and different can't be done, because, after all, no one else has done it that way. This book shares the "unreasonable" principles—from negotiating to risk-taking, from investing to hiring—that have made Eli Broad such a success.Broad helped to create the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Broad Contemporary Art Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Broad, a new museum being built in downtown Los AngelesHis investing approach to philanthropy has led to the creation of scientific and medical research centers in the fields of genomic medicine and stem cell researchAt his alma mater, Michigan State University, he endowed a full-time M.B.A. program, and he and his wife have funded a new contemporary art museum on campus to serve the broader regionEli Broad is the founder of two Fortune 500 companies: KB Home and SunAmericaIf you're stuck doing what reasonable people do—and not getting anywhere—let Eli Broad show you how to be unreasonable, and see how far your next endeavor can go....

Title : The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking
Author :
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ISBN : 9781118173213
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking Reviews

  • David
    2018-11-28 01:24

    Before reading this book, I had never heard of Eli Broad. Now that I read the book, I wonder how I could ever have missed him! He four careers; accounting, homebuilding, retirement savings, and philanthropy. He is the first person to build two Fortune-500 companies, in completely different industries. He is now helping to reform public education, he has assembled world-class art collections and put them into publicly accessible museums, and he contributed $600 million to start a large biomedical research institution.This book contains the advice of Eli Broad; lessons that can be applied to business as well as personal life. For example, he shows how unreasonable persistence can produce "big payoffs", although it is also important to "know when to quit". He advises the reader to forget conventional wisdom, because it strangles innovation. For example, his goal was to build single-family houses that were more affordable than any others on the market. So, he built houses without basements, which at the time was contrary to conventional wisdom. That, and other no-frills cost-savings allowed him to charge about 8% less than any other homebuilder. He describes many other innovations that made his business prosper.Eli Broad shows how hard work and research can help the planning of any innovation. He shows how being first with an innovation is not necessary; being second can sometimes be preferable. He describes the value of delegating work to others. He describes how he hired the best people for the job, and how to keep them from leaving. He discusses the value of leverage--sometimes leverage is monetary, but at other times it is possible to leverage people, too. He has excellent advice for marketing and investing, and how to motivate people.At the end of the book there is a long appendix. It lists the highlights of Eli Broad's career. It lists all of his business ventures, civic activities, educational activities, art activities, government and political activities, philanthropic activities, and honors. The list is 35 pages long!In the very last paragraph of the book, Eli Broad mentions the most important decision of your life; to choose the right person to marry, and spend your life together. In my opinion, that is absolutely good advice.I highly recommend this book. It is entertaining, engaging, and contains a wealth of excellent advice.

  • Matt
    2018-11-30 23:32

    Full disclosure: this book was written by Broad with my friend Swati Pandey, so I'm hardly a neutral observer.That said, I found the book an enjoyable and well-constructed story of Broad's varied career. This type of book is not normally one I read, but Broad has done work in a lot of different areas and he and Swati do a good job of organizing what he has learned into some key life lessons.

  • Sylv C
    2018-12-09 01:30

    Excellent, candid and succinct treatise on commonsensical business principles. I gleaned this book recommendation from Mohnish Pabrai's talk at Google and wasn't disappointed. Tried the audiobook and the narration wasn't for me - much easier to read in print.

  • Ted Alling
    2018-11-23 23:26

    Eli is a legend. I really connected with this story. I so enjoy hearing entrepreneurs stories

  • Christopher Lewis Kozoriz
    2018-12-01 04:51

    "Who you spend your life with-much more so than how you choose to spend it-is the most important decision you can make. Do it right. That's the best advice I can give you." ~ Eli BroadiCurrently the 189th richest person in the world according to Forbes.In his book he shares how he became a billionaire and the lessons of success and failure. The title of the book, "The Art of Being Unreasonable" comes from a quote his wife gave him for his desk from Bernard Shaw, "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." To Eli "unreasonable" means to "think unconventionally". He likes to prove people wrong who say "that it can't be done." He usually finds a way that things can be done by thinking unconventionally.There are also many lessons on philanthropy in this book that we would be wise to follow.

  • Mishna Wolff
    2018-12-06 06:54

    I don't usually like books like this and now with all the hullabaloo about MOCHA it seems he may be the 800 pound gorilla. I also think he made tons of really ugly houses -- but, hey, people gotta live somewhere. Everyone can't live in a built to last turn of the century home. And maybe that's why he's so obsessed with art and architecture today. That being said, I downloaded this for my husband and wound up reading the whole thing myself. He still hasn't even read it. And he's a charming storyteller and a very entertaining guy. I couldn't stop turning the pages. Now, I don't remember almost anything I read, but at the time I really felt like I was learning. Money well spent.

  • Rich Baker
    2018-11-25 05:38

    Overall I liked it. It's not just an educational book. It reads more to me like an autobiography with lessons peppered in. For me, that sums up most autobiographies. He's got a clear friendly writing style and isn't afraid to criticize himself or others as long as it comes with a lesson. Basically, this guy is one of the great businessmen/philanthropers of the 20th century. He built Fortune 500 companies and ran them into major success. He also spearheaded the effort that built Disney Concert Hall, the Broad Museum and many other philanthropic projects.

  • Roy Klein
    2018-11-25 03:35

    I got to about 50% when I realized that the book contains no more useful information. It's not a bad book, but it's a misleading one. While it is dressed as a sort of business oriented decision making adviser, it's actually a biography with sprinkles of simplistic, retrospective do's and don'ts. If you're looking for a non-life changing, but an interesting and short-term inspirational life story, this is the exact effect I got from the book. At around 50% it stopped being inspirational and grew tedious, but up until that point it was a light, interesting read.

  • David DeBacco
    2018-12-12 05:53

    I've always admired Mr. Broad for his passion for art and his generous want to share with the community. It's always enjoyable and informative to read about the journey successful people take in life. My goal is not to be a billionaire, but I guess it doesn't suck! The book gives Broad's mantra - never give up, if it's something you believe in.

  • Kyle
    2018-11-26 06:30

    Great to hear more insight from my mentor and business school founder at Michigan State Business School! Very thoughtfully laid out book with wisdoms on many areas of life and business. Quick and easy read for all ages. Amazing what success in this world can allow you to do both for the economy and as a philanthropic leader. He is a true version of a life well lived!

  • Gamaleldin Soliman
    2018-11-25 22:50

    "reasonable" people come up with all the reasons something new and different can't be done, because, after all, no one else has done it that way. This book shares the "unreasonable" principles—from negotiating to risk-taking, from investing to hiring—that have made Eli Broad such a success.

  • Xavier Shay
    2018-11-18 22:32

    Generally inspiring but didn't take anything novel out of it.I'm more interested in a philosophy that supports splashing $23M on a piece of contemporary art, which he doesn't dive into in any satisfactory depth.

  • Kevin Watt
    2018-12-08 23:24

    A very quick read on Eli Broad, a man who amassed massive amounts of money and then power. But, the book never gives up any specific detail on how he really accomplished it. The book reads more like a pat on the back for being a good business man and doing things his way.

  • Anandh Sundar
    2018-12-02 01:32

    Really excellent book which also focusses on the HOW to be unreasonable-do the groundwork needed for an opinion/view before deserving to hold it. Also, the stream of fields where Eli has achieved, makes this book a unique one to read

  • Ahmed
    2018-12-07 06:27

    The book is to the point, almost there is no Blaa Blaa statements, It is good if you looking for something like that. Not sophisticated wordingVery Practical, and inspiring. You can implement some of advice straight away. I did try that, it went so good.

  • Dwight Walker
    2018-11-14 06:53

    Bill Gates read this

  • David Woo
    2018-11-29 01:37

    Very bad book.Full of cliche. Advice was so general and anecdote, not to sure how you would implement. Definitely do not recommend.

  • Jeanne
    2018-11-22 01:31

    A fascinating story of the business career of Eli Broad, a man who has had his fingers in many pies. Well worth the read.

  • Anastasia
    2018-11-14 03:35

    It's a good book, but I wish he talked more about The Broad Institute, Eric Lander & the big picture of science funding.

  • Big O
    2018-12-11 04:47

    This guy pulls no punches. Very cool. VERY refreshing.

  • Christopher Rising
    2018-11-28 06:29

    It was a solid book, interesting for Los Angelenos. It lacked graciousness but had some more revealing chapters at the end, I liked it.

  • Dustin
    2018-11-26 22:44

    Interesting combo of a memoir and sharing advice from a driven businessman's life.

  • Joseph
    2018-12-01 05:53

    Modesty is not at the top of this authors list. There is good advice in the first couple of chapters and he has been incredibly successful. but after chapter 4 its just bragging.

  • Theodore Kinni
    2018-11-21 06:53

    A billionaire philanthropist/entrepreneur's memoir organized into lesson-based chapters. Gotta be something of value from a guy who created two Fortune 500 companies, right?

  • Arun ks
    2018-12-07 04:54

    "If not lived, sure you can't say honestly I lived " - I am not the one who would disagree Eli Broad Lived.

  • Walterfgreen
    2018-12-05 05:49

    I disagree with much of his advice and I couldn't relate to many of the stories told.