Read Coyote Stories by Mourning Dove Online

coyote-stories

A powerful force and yet the butt of humor, the coyote figure runs through the folklore of many American Indian tribes. He can be held up as a "terrible example" of conduct, a model of what not to do, and yet admired for a careless. anarchistic energy that suggests unlimited possibilities. Mourning Dove, an Okanagan, knew him well from the legends handed down by her peopleA powerful force and yet the butt of humor, the coyote figure runs through the folklore of many American Indian tribes. He can be held up as a "terrible example" of conduct, a model of what not to do, and yet admired for a careless. anarchistic energy that suggests unlimited possibilities. Mourning Dove, an Okanagan, knew him well from the legends handed down by her people. She preserved them for posterity in Coyote Stories, originally published in 1933. Here is Coyote, the trickster, the selfish individualist, the imitator, the protean character who indifferently puts the finishing touches on a world soon to receive human beings. And here is Mole, his long-suffering wife, and all the other Animal People, including Fox, Chipmunk, Owl-Woman, Rattlesnake, Grizzly Bear, Porcupine, and Chickadee. Here it is revealed why Skunk's tail is black and white, why Spider has such long legs, why Badger is so humble, and why Mosquito bites people. These entertaining, psychologically compelling stories will be welcomed by a wide spectrum of readers.Jay Miller has supplied an introduction and notes for this Bison Books edition and restored chapters that were deleted from the original....

Title : Coyote Stories
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780803281691
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 246 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Coyote Stories Reviews

  • Beth Cato
    2018-11-23 01:47

    These interesting stories of the Salish Plateau focus on Coyote. Mourning Dove is a good storyteller, and I found this book of tales more smoothly written than others. I also appreciated the addition of footnotes to explain regional geography, real-life incidents, and symbolism related to the myths. Mourning Dove sanitized the stories to sell to a white audience; in the back, she is quoted about how she would never be able to sell stories of Skunk as the tribe really told them. A more traditional Skunk story is added after that to illustrate; he's a very flatulent animal whose 'asset' is stolen! The notes also point out that Coyote's medicine, his source of special power, comes from his feces. This is never clear within the actual stories. This combination of good, though sanitized storytelling with deeper notes really sets this collection above many others and lends it a sense of authenticity.

  • Polaris Hall
    2018-11-21 01:53

    I grew up with this book. Almost every night, my dad would read to me a story or two and I loved it. Hearing Coyote's misadventures always both entertained me and educated me, the interesting plots and simple morals expressed shaped me as who I am today.

  • Kbord
    2018-12-06 06:48

    The footnotes, foreword, notes, and appendix explain well that these stories have been cleaned up for reading by white children. (Hey, it was written in the 1930s.) And Skunk stories were kept out because Mourning Dove says she would have been thrown in jail for including them (at the time). Coyote seems to me to be a mixture of creator, trickster, and clown, and also an example of how not to be.I'm told I should have waited till winter to read Coyote stories.

  • Moon Captain
    2018-11-17 03:56

    One of the most entertaining books I've ever read

  • Julia
    2018-11-20 22:41

    This is a somewhat cleaned up version of "Just How" stories of the Okanagan and other closely tribes with Coyote as the protagonist. The reason that I say somewhat cleaned up version is the fact that if you read the notes for some of the stories within the book then you will find what the author had originally changed in the stories to make them more user-friendly when it first came out. The stories were usually short, to the point and usually included some type of tale. Coyote was usually in trouble or fixing some type of trouble - sometimes even doing both. And of course some stories didn't have Coyote at all but some of the other Animal People. I loved how the book included facts about the culture of the tribe, how it mentioned in detail the features that were made and how changes in the history of the tribes also affected the stories that were being told. In a sense you were reading history all over again but being entertained at the same time. Finally I enjoyed the fact the author did include some of the Native names of the Animal People and the meanings of those names. I wish there was a better pronunciation guide also for some of the words since there were a few that had me dumbfounded. This book is truly a keeper for me :). I would really look forward to this book if they had someone of the tribes to actual do an audio recording so that way you could hear the stories being told like they were meant to and with the right pronunciation. Dreams....

  • Bradley
    2018-11-19 00:43

    This collection of stories was a quick read that was well worth the purchase. I find Native American folklore to be fascinating, and so this compilation of their stories about Coyote and how he played a part in nature's processes was quite a treat. I have never read anything quite like it. The stories are for the most part simple and fun, and they can easily be referred back to. All ages will enjoy the contents of this book. It only received four stars because there is nothing that makes me feel a strong desire to pull it back off the shelf and read it again, even though I probably will someday to refresh myself on the stories. It is definitely one that will be available for my children to read someday, because the stories exercise the mind's imaginative abilities.

  • Christopher
    2018-11-11 22:49

    The stories presented and adapted here are very well written and a good introduction for a younger audience, but its a shame this otherwise good series of transcriptions were toned down and kind of 'de-grossified' by the era and sensibilities of the author.

  • Renee
    2018-11-20 05:33

    This is a particular book of interest to me not only because it the is the trickster cycle but my Great Uncle Dean was the editor.

  • Sarah
    2018-11-25 05:50

    another set of random stories that we had around the house as a kid, perfect for picking up as entertainment for a half an hour on a lazy afternoon.

  • Jacob Beavers
    2018-12-08 01:39

    A little G-rated for Coyote myths, but amusing, and the slightly more inappropriate stories in the introduction made up for it.

  • Scott Roberts
    2018-12-06 23:51

    Reminded me of Rudyard Kipling's Just So stories I do need to look at the next full moon and see if I see a frog