Read Right to Education: The Way Forward by Vinay Rai Narendra Kumar Online

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Nearly eight years after the Constitution was amended to make education a fundamental right, the government in April 2010 implemented a historic law to provide free and compulsory education to all children in the age group of 6-14 years.The 86th Constitutional amendment making education a fundamental right was passed by Parliament in 2002. The Right of Children to Free andNearly eight years after the Constitution was amended to make education a fundamental right, the government in April 2010 implemented a historic law to provide free and compulsory education to all children in the age group of 6-14 years.The 86th Constitutional amendment making education a fundamental right was passed by Parliament in 2002. The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, a law to enable the implementation of the fundamental right, was passed by Parliament last year. The Act is being touted by the UPA government as another major achievement after Right to Information Act and National Rural Employment Guarantee Act.The new law makes it obligatory on part of the state governments and local bodies to ensure that every child gets education in a school in the neighbourhood. Its implementation will directly benefit close to one crore children who do not go to schools at present. These children, who have either dropped out from schools or have never been to any educational institution, will be enrolled in schools.At present, there are nearly 22 crore children in the relevant age group. However, 4.6 per cent of these children (nearly 92 lakh) are out of school. The school management committee or the local authority will identify the drop-outs or out of school children above six years of age and admit them in classes appropriate to their age after giving special training.The Act makes it a right of every child to get education and makes it obligatory for the appropriate governments to ensure that every child gets free elementary education. The Act mandates that even private educational institutions have to reserve 25 per cent seats for children from weaker sections.This book by two eminent & experienced educationists captures this essence of the Act by explaining its relevance to an aspiring India and millions for whom the legislation is a key tool for emancipation. It analyses key obstacles and challenges before the Act. The study also highlights the importance of Public-Private-Partnership model in the country's education system and suggests a prescription for successful implementation of the Act....

Title : Right to Education: The Way Forward
Author :
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ISBN : 9788191083316
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 164 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Right to Education: The Way Forward Reviews

  • Atul Sabnis
    2019-01-06 09:28

    One of the many reasons you pick a book is because of the author's credentials. Right to Education: The Way Forward was one such book.Given my interest in education and generally the paradox that the Right to Education Act is all about, this seemed to be a good book to pick up. Being shrink-wrapped, when I saw it in the book store, I was left to judge the book only by its cover - and the author bios on the back cover.I am terribly disappointed by this book.For one, it seems that this was supposed to be primarily to be just a paper and few thoughts that have been converted to a book. There is significant repetition of nay, not just paragraphs, but pages altogether. Many sentences find their way back into the text matter shamelessly, with unfailing regularity. The editor has done a shoddy job, ("short of human capital by 17 millions"), and Indian words like "melas" are not marked out in any way.As far as the core content of the book, it does not provide any fresh perspective on the Act - the challenges and the solutions mentioned in the book have been argued ad nauseam. The research material from which certain assumptions are derived are very limited, and are repeatedly referred in the book. There is a vast amount of literature out there from organisations like NEUPA and UNESCO and the MHRD site, which does not find any mention in the book.At the end of the book, I felt that this book was not written by the authors; they have just lent their name to it. Further, for such a low-quality publication to come out of and be endorsed by ASSOCHAM's President, Dr. Swati Piramal, was equally disappointing.Finally, since this book did not show up in the GoodReads library, I had to add it to the library. As I filled in the details, I was very surprised to note that the blurb on jacket flaps was taken from an article by India Today.A serious case of plagiarism, if you ask me. And a serious case of dismay.